Palais de l'Angleterre / British pavilion

Paris 1900 - Architecture, pavilions, gardens, urban furniture
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Extract of book "The Royal Pavilion - Paris International Exhibition, 1900"

THE CORRIDOR.

The Mezzotint Engravings.

IN the Corridor were hung some exceedingly fine mezzotint engravings by English artists, a portion of Lord Cheylesmore’s admirable collection.

The British School of Mezzotint Engraving has a great reputation abroad, so that it was a happy idea to show some of the best examples in the Royal Pavilion. Nine of its most famous exponents were here represented, viz., James MacArdell, Valentine Green, John Dixon, Thomas Watson, R. Dunkarton, John Jones, W. Dickinson, J. R. Smith, and W. Ward.

During the last year or two appreciation of the engraver’s art has wonderfully grown, and the market value set upon it has risen very rapidly. Formerly it was thought that a record price had been reached when a good example of “The Ladies Waldegrave," after Reyrnolds, by Val. Green, realised the sum of 580 guineas.

More recently, however, a print of “ Lady Bamfylde," after Reynolds, b}' T. Watson, brought 880 guineas in a public auction room, but even that price has been eclipsed by the sum of 1,000 guineas paid for the engraving of “The Duchess of Rutland," after Reynolds, by Val. Green, and of 1,160 guineas paid for a fine copy of “Mrs. Carnac,” after Reynolds, by J. R. Smith. Examples of all these engravings will be found in the following pages.


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Re: Palais de l'Angleterre / British pavilion

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Extract of book "The Royal Pavilion - Paris International Exhibition, 1900"

The library
The library

THE LIBRARY.

To the right of the Hall was a Library, fitted up and furnished by the Corporation of the City of Bath. Oak panelling in
the style of the seventeenth century, with a deep carved frieze, decorated the walls. The ceiling was copied from one of the ceilings of The Hall, and the high-backed chairs were reproduced from seventeenth century chairs in the possession of the Earl of Westmorland.

The panels of the painted frieze illustrated various royal visits to the city, and these were framed in decoration of strap-work pattern from the designs of Major Davis, F.S.A., the city architect

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Re: Palais de l'Angleterre / British pavilion

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Extract of book "The Royal Pavilion - Paris International Exhibition, 1900"

The Dining-room.
The Dining-room.


THE DINING-ROOM.

THE Dining-room was panelled in oak from floor lo ceiling, and I ihc panelling was relieved by pilasters and carved frieze. The ceiling was a reproduction of one at Knole. Eleven magnificent pictures decorated the room, of which the five following were by Sir Joshua Reynolds: “Lady Gertrude Fitzpatrick,” daughter of John, Earl of Upper Ossory, and of Anne Liddell, his wife, some time Duchess of Grafton. She died unmarried. The picture represents her as “Collina" standing on a hill, with flowers at her feet, in a simple white dress, the skirts gathered up at the waist. It was painted in 1779 for the Earl of Upper Ossory, who was an intimate friend of Sir Joshua, and has been engraved five times. It was lent by Sir Charles Tennant. This portrait bears a striking resemblance to “Robinetta" in the National Gallery, although it is thought that the latter is a stud}' of the lion. Mrs. Tollemache.

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Re: Palais de l'Angleterre / British pavilion

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Extract of book "The Royal Pavilion - Paris International Exhibition, 1900"

The Drawing-room
The Drawing-room


THE DRAWING-ROOM.

THE Drawing-room, designed, decorated, and furnished in the style of the period of James I., was a handsome room, with doors of carved oak, and walls hung with red silk, which afforded an appropriate background for the pictures. The ceiling was copied from the famous one at Broughton Castle, the moulds for which were provided by the Victoria and Albert Museum. The chimney-piece was reproduced from one in the Cartoon Gallery at Knole, by permission of Lord Sackville.


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Re: Palais de l'Angleterre / British pavilion

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Extract of book "The Royal Pavilion - Paris International Exhibition, 1900"

Stairway and Gallery
Stairway and Gallery

The Staircase, First floor
The Staircase, First floor

The Stairway
The Stairway


THE STAIRWAY AND GALLERY.


The Grand Staircase was an effective feature, and was cleverly I adapted by the architect from a staircase at Knole. Its fine screen was in two tiers of triple arcades, the spandrels and soffits of which were filled with ornamental strap-work, the quaint carving of the Jacobean period appearing in the grotesque figures and the newel tops in the form of heraldic animals.

At the foot of the staircase, in a bank of flowers, stood a east from the admirable and life-like bust of Queen Victoria by Mr. E. Onslow Ford, R.A., one of the very few busts for which Her Majesty gave several sittings. It was begun at Osborne in February, 1898, and was continued at Windsor. It was Mr. Ford’s original intention to use it as a study for another work (his Manchester statue), but the Queen viewed it with much favour and wished to have it as a bust in the Castle. This was done, and Her Majesty, as recently as a fortnight before her death, presented replicas in marble or bronze to various friends and members of the Royal Family. Replicas of the bust ma}' also be seen in various provincial cities and institutions of the United Kingdom.

Of the nine pictures decorating the walls of the Grand Staircase, three were by Gainsborough, and included the remarkable portrait of General Hollywood. It is the largest work by that master, and has the reputation of being the finest equestrian portrait ever painted by an Englishman, rivalling Van Dyck’s “Charles I.” in the National Gallery, with which it has more than once been compared. The Honywoods were an old Kentish family, deriving their origin from a place called Henewood or Hunewood, in the parish of Postling in Kent, where they held lands not long after the Conquest, and retained them until 1605.


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Re: Palais de l'Angleterre / British pavilion

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Extract of book "The Royal Pavilion - Paris International Exhibition, 1900"

The Long Gallery, looking West.
The Long Gallery, looking West.

The Long Gallery, looking East.
The Long Gallery, looking East.

THE LONG GALLERY.

The Long Gallery, the principal apartment in the house, was I adapted from the famous Cartoon Gallery at Knole. It occupied the whole width of the building, and was about 75 feet long, by 20 feet wide, and 18 feet high. The oak floor was covered with antique Persian rugs. The monumental chimney-piece was copied from one at Knole. The ceiling, which was decorated with a rich rib-work pattern, with floral ornamentation in the spaces, was modelled in very high relief in plaster lrom the ceiling of the Cartoon Gallery at Knole.


The mullioned windows were glazed with small leaded panes, and in order that the room might be as complete as possible every detail of the stately gallery at Knole was followed with extraordinary care. The original fire-grate and dogs, the silver sconces upon the walls, the chandeliers, mirrors, silver tables, etc., as reproduced by Messrs. Elkington for the Victoria and Albert Museum, found an appropriate place.

The treatment of the walls consisted of a low oak dado with strap ornament decoration of the Jacobean period, broken at intervals by carved oak pilasters. The dado was surmounted by a cut pile damask in deep red on a ground of old gold. A handsome frieze decorated the window side of the gallery. The doorways had semicircular tops of carved stone, and the tapestry of the walls was brought up to finish at the stonework in a way often seen in old country houses. The eighteenth century lead figures, both here and on the terraces, were lent by Mr. J. H. Fitzhenry.

The fifteen pictures in the Tong Gallery were amongst the finest in the entire collection ; every one was a masterpiece. Gainsborough, whom Ruskin described as the purest colourist of the whole English school, was here seen as a landscapist as well as a portrait painter. In his lifetime he was regarded as a portrait painter only; and it was left to a later and, perhaps, a more appreciative age to recognise his great talent as a master of landscape. In this gallery also Constable was shown to a nation which has always held him in highest honour.

Gainsborough’s "The Harvest Waggon,” lent by Lord Tweed-mouth, is a grand landscape, and recalls “ The Market Cart,” by the same master in the National Gallery. The driver is stopping his team to take up a girl. This girl was one of the artist’s daughters, afterwards Mrs. Fulcher, and the figure in the cart looking at the man drinking was the other.
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