Pavilion of the future / Pavilhão do futuro

Expo Lisbon 1998 - Architecture, pavilions, gardens, urban furniture, pictures, drawings, videos
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Pavilion of the future / Pavilhão do futuro

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Text from a CD of Expo 2000 Hannover - The History of World Fairs

Of the five large pavilions at Expo '98, only the pavilion of the future was a temporary building that was to be demolished after the exhibition. The architects Paula Santos, Rui Ramos and Miguel Guedes tried to integrate the three functional rooms of their glass-fronted, corrugated polycarbonate building into the block construction surrounding the site.

The cylinder-shaped entrance was entirely covered with wood. Wide ramps led to the trapezoidal conference room where visitors were briefed on the exhibition. From there, through galleries, it was possible to reach the actual exhibition hall, which reflected a simple cubic architecture. The architects worked with strong contrasts of light. The path from the dark conference room through the very naturally lit galleries and into a dark blue exhibition scroll leading to balconies, railings and vaulted galleries. The theme of the pavilion was a journey through time, beginning with the birth of the earth and the oceans and ending with an optimistic look into the future.
In particular, the contribution of humans and other living beings on the planet to the continued development of the seas was highlighted. As in the other thematic pavilions, sound, light and images played an important role. The message conveyed by the exhibition designers was not very different from the one that Expo '98 wanted to convey: "We want to change the average visitor's perception and behaviour with regard to the oceans by showing them that protecting the oceans is a collective duty. As in all the other thematic exhibitions, visitors could take a "journey". Transposed into the role of "researchers and explorers", they could discover the richness of the sea and were prepared for their future duties in the field of ocean protection. Only by the design and the different architectures could the "average visitor" guess whether he was in the pavilion of utopias or the pavilion of the future.



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Re: Pavilion of the future / Pavilhão do futuro

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Text extracted from "Guia Expo'98"

Duration of the visit: 60 m.
Schedule: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
No. of people/visit: 550
Total visitors/day: 20 000 (2 000 people/hour)
Building project: Paula Santos. Rui Ramos and Miguel Guedes
Interior design: Pedro Ravara and Nuno Vidigal/Baixa Atelier de Arquitectura
Area: 9 440 m2 (including an auditorium with 597 seats)


A dive into the great abyssal seas, alerting us to the current threats to the oceans and how to avoid their destruction

The last of the large thematic pavilions is an invitation to "explore" the marine world, which begins in the Atlas Room, a kind of waiting atrium, where the visitor waits for 15 minutes. Here, six globes illustrate the main moments of the formation of the oceans, the drift of the continents and the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. A sphere with a diameter of 5.5 metres represents the Globe and the reliefs on the surface of the continents and on the bottom of the ocean. Remember

Pavilion of the future - Expo'98
Pavilion of the future - Expo'98
futur.JPG (46.09 Kio) Vu 105 fois

that the seas correspond to two thirds of the Planet and that their content is still largely undiscovered.
The visit itself begins with a three-dimensional multimedia show, The Threatened Ocean, for which visitors need special glasses - Veronica and her friend, a white whale, dive in to show the threats to the oceans posed by man's small, everyday actions. The show, which lasts ten minutes, includes laser beams and water "falling" from the ceiling.

Then, you walk through the Atlas Room again, this time with a view from the top level, and move on to the Ocean Observatory, which has three exhibition spaces. An electrified scenography on maps represents surface currents and shows the true proportions between the continents and the ocean. Suspended from the ceiling, there are observation instruments used to detect ocean currents. Further ahead, in a mirror of water, where there are waves, the phenomena of interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere are explained, for example the EI Nino. Light effects are used to simulate lightning and thunder every five minutes.

Pavilion of the future - Expo'98
Pavilion of the future - Expo'98

Once you have passed the Eureka technology room, a 200-metre ramp takes you slowly "diving" into oceanic environments on the Deep Blue Promenade. It starts on the beaches and ends in the great abyssal trenches, where the sunlight does not reach. The route is complemented by video images, photographs and ambient sound. At the end of this sector, a video documentary focuses on research into the ocean's abyssal fossae. In the last area, "somewhere in the underwater depths", the setting is futuristic. In a spherical aquarium (the largest built to date) are some jellyfish, very fragile living organisms. The aim is to make the visitor experience the fragility of marine life and to transmit the basic idea of the exhibition: One Earth, One Ocean, One Life.


A unique experience is the passage through the Sound Tunnel, in which you can feel and understand the role of sound propagation waves as a means of communication between marine species, and how sound can be heard in the water.



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